Art & CultureStudent Life

Fine Arts Gallery’s March exhibit showcases the works of filmmaker Adam Sekuler

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By Wade Walker

The Fine Arts Gallery at Colorado State University-Pueblo, as part of a monthly showcase, features the art of filmmaker Adam Sekuler for its March exhibit. A special screening of his film “Tomorrow Never Knows” will be held in the library immediately followed by a reception in the gallery, including food and beverages followed by a Q and A with the artist. The film will be shown on March 31st, at 5:00 p.m, in the library in room 109.

“It’s a great opportunity for the community and the university to come together.” Caroline Peters, CSU-Pueblo assistant professor of art, said.

The gallery, titled Sacrament and Service: The Rituals of Adam Sekuler, features the works of the prolific filmmaker from Boulder, CO. A three-part exhibit comprised of photographs, videos and instillation art, Sekuler’s work is a diverse array of multimedia.

“His work centers around the place of ritual and contemporary life.” Peters said.

In a collection of photos titled the “Weatherman Daily Series,” Sekuler took a picture of the sky every day for four years. He selected 17 of them as a series to show not only the passing of time but also the interconnectedness of his art with himself.

“My interest is to explore light and the way it is intersecting with me on a daily basis.” he said.

Anyone interested in following his work beyond the scope of the exhibit can connect with him on Instagram where they will find many more photos from the Weatherman series. His website is also full of samples of his art. www.maidezfilms.com

“It’s like a diary in a sense, it shows how it is about the life of the artist as well.” Peters said.

Alzheimer’s has impacted countless lives, Sekuler’s added. He watched helplessly as his friend deteriorated from the disease and it had a big impact on him. It inspired him to make a film that explored “the thin line between life and death.”

A harrowing look into dementia and deterioration, the film is called “Tomorrow Never Knows” in which he follows a Buhddist man with Alzheimer’s and documents the struggle of his last days in which he starved himself to death. It is his third film about death. He says with relief that he is done making films about death and dying. The gallery features a video instillation called “Held Breath” where a preview of his film can be viewed.

A second video instillation entitled “Mimic,” offers something completely different. 25 participants were asked to mimic cricket sound while Sekuler recorded them. He buried a video monitor in a wood pile instillation where the recording plays on a 110-minute loop.

“It’s fascinating because those are the materials we use in our daily life, we always have our phones on hand, so to me this exhibit will relate to a lot of people but it will use those mediums with depth.” Peters said.

Sekuler has a bachelor’s in film studies from University of Minnesota and he is currently finishing his master’s of fine art at University of Colorado in Boulder. He has worked in film for over 15 years and curated programs throughout the world.