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The dead don’t stay dead for long: a movie review of “R.I.P.D.”

Submitted by on July 31, 2013 – 11:34 pmNo Comment
RIPD

The death of a cop is not usually a matter taken lightly, but in the movie “R.I.P.D. Rest in Peace Department,” actors Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds have their audience dying from laughter… literally. Photo courtesy of http://www.hdwallpapers.in/ripd_movie-wallpapers.html

The death of a cop is not usually a matter taken lightly, but in the movie “R.I.P.D. Rest in Peace Department,” actors Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds have their audience dying from laughter… literally. 

Nick, played by Ryan Reynolds, is a cop who is gunned down and murdered while in the line of duty. However, instead of being judged for the foolish decisions of his life, he is given the option of becoming a Rest In Peace Department officer, someone who captures and contains the dead who hide among the living.

With help from his grumpy and vulgar new partner Roy, played by Jeff Bridges, Nick must deal with his unresolved business while stopping a disaster that could threaten the safety of all living kind.

After watching the movie for a small amount of time, there is no doubt that this film will resonate with a certain type of person, mainly a person who appreciates a warped sense of humor and violence. Throughout the movie, there is an abundance of odd or unusual concepts.

To ensure that R.I.P.D. officers do not try to resume the lives they led before their deaths, they are given a new appearance and identity. However, for Nick and Roy, those new identities are the polar opposites of what their lives used to be.

Rough and tough cowboy from the Old West Roy has the avatar of an attractive blonde in a tight skirt. Nick, on the other hand, has the avatar of an elderly Asian man who runs around town with a banana. This eccentric idea of an afterlife “witness protection” plan is just one example of the twisted humor in the movie “R.I.P.D. Rest in Peace Department”

The manner in which the real appearances of the disguised dead are revealed is another quite unusual concept. Let’s just say that the dead will probably refuse a meal if it is from a certain country.

It is probably not surprising that a film about a deceased cop chasing after the escaped dead is full to the brim with violence. For those who are uncomfortable with high-powered guns blowing the dead to dust, it is very wise to avoid this movie.

Also some may consider the appearance of the dead to be unsettling. As a warning, in some scenes there are very realistic deaths that may be too graphic for some viewers.

However, for those who like action scenes and violent deaths, this movie has pretty decent effects. For some of the scenes, which have truly out-of-this-world concepts, “R.I.P.D. Rest in Peace Department” holds its own with brilliant color and twisted creature effects.

The quality of sound may be a drawback to the film.  During some of the high-speed action scenes, Roy, who had a prevalent accent, was often hard to understand.

“R.I.P.D. Rest in Peace Department” is a film that is inappropriate for children or sensitive adults to see. The rating of PG-13 should not be taken lightly.

With a tough lawman like Roy, who died during the 1800’s, it is expected that his manners and language would fit his era. Roy is not shy about speaking about women in a manner that some may find inappropriate. Obscene content, such as prostitution and sex can be found in the movie.

With a film such as “R.I.P.D. Rest in Peace Department,” there are going to be action scenes in which the main characters are not too concern with their language, so anyone who is upset by foul language should steer clear from this movie.

However, if you can stomach the graphic violence and the crude content and language, this movie is sure to be a hit with those who like to see death in a new light. For its twisted humor, its abundance in violence, and its decent visual effects, I would give this movie four and a half stars.

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