News

Black Student Union to host poetry slam

804views
The Black Student Union will host a poetry slam Sept. 24. | Image courtesy of redherringlounge.com
The Black Student Union will host a poetry slam Sept. 24. | Image courtesy of redherringlounge.com

CSU-Pueblo’s Black Student Union will be hosting a Poetry Slam Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. in the Occhiato University Center Underground. The event is free to everyone.

“We will never charge for BSU events. We want students to connect with each other so they can make new friends at the events we host,” said BSU President Jehu Saintjour.

This event was originally scheduled for Sept. 17 but due to other events going on in the OUC, the poetry slam was pushed back another week.

High chairs, candles, dim lighting and refreshments are going be severed in hopes of creating a warm and comfortable scene for the readings.

To promote the event, BSU’s treasurer Katy Barnes utilized word of mouth, asking English professor Dorothy Heedt and debate coach Nicole Grider to spread the word to their students and children. Another way they are promoting is by passing out flyers to reach students and the public.

“I want the event to be fresh in everyone’s minds. That’s why we will be handing out flyers this week and next week along with using word of mouth,” Barnes said.

Students can read poems, short stories, raps, do acapella or any original work.

The club encourages students who want to participate to go to Pack Link, CSU-Pueblo’s website for student organizations, to sign up. They will also be taking walkups.

Saintjour and Barnes said they wanted the poetry slam to be a place where students can express themselves.

BSU does not have a goal number of people that they want to attend. However if there is a good turnout they said they would possibly make it a monthly event.

“BSU is a group of individuals that wish to make a difference on campus by creating a unified student body,” according to an excerpt taken from BSU’s mission statement.

This organization was not active for the last two years. In 2013, BSU members tried to reintroduce the organization but were unsuccessful with their efforts. This year, with the organization being active, they hope to create a firm foundation for all the years to come.

“I want to set a good example so the person who takes over being president when I graduate will know how to run BSU successfully,” Saintjour said.