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Bring Back Stig!

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The Hasan School of Business at CSU – Pueblo is starting the school year without one of its iconic staff members.

Stig Jantz, a student advisor for the department was asked to resign last summer. The announcement was made without any explanation from the administration, and much to the chagrin of students. Though there was a meeting on August 16 for students to voice their concerns and ask questions, there is still no clear answer on why Jantz was asked to leave.

CSU-Pueblo students have already made a Facebook account asking for Jantz return to the department. The Web page features students voicing their opinions about the resignation and their memories of the former advisor.

The account, which already has more than 900 people, also features videos of the protest and meetings with President Joe Garcia and Provost Russ Meyer.

Michael Fronmueller, dean of the school of business, said he realizes the impact this decision had on students, but cannot offer any answers.

“I am saddened by the emotional impact that this situation has created for some of our students.  However, as much as I would like to provide you and others with more information, I am not in a position to do so,” Fronmueller said.

This answer does not satisfy all of the student’s curiosity. Vanessa Rodriguez, a junior majoring in business management said the department should have told the students beforehand.

“I think everyone was kind of in the dark about everything. All of a sudden it was just kind of like, it happened, and no one expected it, no one saw it coming,” Rodriguez said.

“We were very blindsided. I think students should of at least known a little bit beforehand what was going on,” Rodriguez said.

Rodriguez said the faculty should have notified the students.

“I wish they would have at least told us if there might have been problems or exactly what was going on. We’re still in the dark, we don’t know what happened, we don’t know why it happened,” Rodriguez said.

“It’s heartbreaking knowing that he’s gone,” Rodriguez said.

Rodriguez said there are many things students are saying about the resignation.

“I’ve heard so many different things. I don’t know what to believe. Just that he (Jantz) and the dean didn’t get along, (that’s) the biggest rumor being spread right now. But at the same time, how can you not get along with Stig? Maybe he felt threatened?” Rodriguez said.

Rodriguez said she still has fond memories of Jantz.

Stig Jantz, center, speaking with students before his resignation. Photo courtesy of the CSU-Pueblo website.

“He’s always so loving. He cares about your life after school. I think that was the biggest thing, because most faculty members don’t take the time to get to know you. They know you, but they don’t get to know your personal life,” Rodriguez said.

“I feel as if he brought a sense of family here, and I know people from out of state or out of town, he was part of their family,” Rodriguez said.

Rodriguez said Jantz not only cared about the students’ academics, he also cared about the students’ personal lives.

 “I can honestly say, if you walked next to Stig, he’d know you, he’d know what high school you came from, he’d know what you’re involved in on campus, your family situation, everything,” Rodriguez said.

“But if you walk next to the dean, I don’t think the students would even know if that was the dean. He needs to be more out there, I think now especially since all this has happened and he’s not.”

Peggy Dagendesh, a junior majoring in accounting, remembers Jantz was always there for students.

“Stig was well liked by every student he assisted. He was there for the students when they needed advice concerning what classes to take, and what to do if they were failing a class,” Dagendesh said. “He had between three to five students in his office at any given time, and he never took a lunch break away from his desk.

Dagendesh said Jantz always helped students, no matter the problem, with a positive attitude.

“Stig was always available when you needed him most, and he directed you to where you needed to go, be it Financial Aid or to speak with a professor. If you sent him an e-mail, he responded quickly and with an answer. He had a charismatic personality, and you never saw him depressed,” Dagendesh said.

Rebecca Wright, a junior majoring in accounting, said she noticed the shock of the resignation in the department.              

“I think that as lot of students came, they were very surprised and shocked. I think [the administration] should of told the students, because a lot were just walking around saying, ‘What happened to Stig? Where is he?’” Wright said.

CSU-Pueblo students on the Facebook page, “Bring Stig Jantz Back to CSU-Pueblo” wrote about how they felt about Jantz’s resignation and the memories they had of the former student advisor.

Michael Aushenker said the department will not be the same without him.

“Losing Stig Jantz is a big blow to CSU-Pueblo. Good luck moving forward without him. It won’t be the same, Stig is an original!” Aushenker wrote on the Facebook page.

David McAlpin said Jantz was an advisor who cared not only about academics, but about student’s lives.

“This man truly cared about what happened to the students! He was a hard working, dedicated and compassionate human being who was not only my advisor, but someone I could come talk to at any time. I hope they get him back, because he is the one person who really cares about the students at the university!” McAlpin wrote on the Facebook page.

Clifton Ford said the resignation was unfair to the students, as well as the university.

“Stig is the one faculty member on campus I know I can address any problems or questions to, and he will have answers and positive solutions. The best faculty member of any kind I have met on campus, this forced resignation is an injustice to both the students and the school as a whole,” Ford wrote on the Facebook page.

Leon Washington said Jantz always made him feel like he belonged on the campus.       

“As a black student, I have always felt a bit displaced on the [CSU-Pueblo] campus. That’s no statement on the campus culture, but simply a fact of campus demographics. Stig’s generosity and open spirit always made me feel welcome and comfortable,” Washington wrote on the Facebook page.

With all of the confusion and anger Jantz’s resignation has caused, Vanessa Rodriguez said not only has it affected the students, it has negatively affected the ambience of the department.

“I think there’s no sense of unity in HSB anymore. I saw us as being the most powerful school on campus. As a business student, you’re so proud to be a business student,” Rodriguez said.

“We’re still proud because we have an accredited school. At the same time, it’s almost like a death in the family, there’s been a death in our family in HSB. There’s a sense of not even belonging there now. We’re just there,” Rodriguez said.