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Senator McCain Visits CSU-Pueblo Community

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protestorssmall.jpgcheeringcrowdsmall.jpgSen. John McCain said the bailout is a tourniquet, temporarily mending the broken economy, but not a cure. Sen. McCain focused primarily on the economy in his speech Friday at the Massari Arena.

In addition to the bailout, Sen. McCain said that new energy will open jobs for people in Colorado and help lessen the nation’s dependence on foreign oil.

America needs to look more into coal technology, McCain said. He also said that drilling offshore and looking into other energy alternatives like nuclear energy will be a way to end foreign oil dependency and also provide jobs.

His other solution to the failing economy is to cut pork barrel spending and earmarks. He promised to veto the first pork barrel spending earmark that came across his desk if he is elected president.

He also said he will examine every government agency and “clean house” when it comes to over spending in the White House.

Other issues addressed in his speech were health care reform and the Iraq war.

Sen. McCain said he wants to deliver a $5,000 refundable tax credit to Americans, which he said they could use to choose their own provider of health care.

He also promised to bring troops home with victory and honor, saying that the troops were beginning to become successful.

To start his speech, McCain also appealed to local audiences by bringing up the issue of water in Colorado.

“Thank you for the water,” McCain said after telling a cheering crowd that water is scarce in his home state of Arizona.

After a short statement about his goals as President, McCain also had a question and answer portion, staying true to the theme of the town hall meeting.

McCain took four questions from the audience; the first was from a Vietnam veteran who asked about his policy on post traumatic stress syndrome.

McCain’s answer related back to his health care reform saying that veterans need to be better taken care of and should have the choice of where they are treated.

The second question was from a man who retired from the Air Force who asked the Senator more details about the bailout.

“Why don’t we help the people and not the banks?” the man in the crowd asked.

Sen. McCain responded by saying that the issue was more complicated than that and outlined how the bailout will stop the decline in home values and allow homeowners who have not already suffered foreclosures to stay in their houses.

“This is not a bailout for Wall Street,” he said, highlighting how the tax payer will be the first to be paid back when the economy begins to rise.

He also proposed a deal through the Federal Housing Administration that would allow any homeowner to get a 30-year home loan through the agency.

The third question answered was from a high school student who asked Sen. McCain about his policy on education.

Sen. McCain responded by saying that the key to education reform is choice and competition.

McCain said that charter schools work and he wants to give parents the choice of where to send their children.

He also said he wants to delay the requirement for college students to pay back student loan debt and make sure that student loans are available; he also wants to provide tuition funding for college students.

The last question was from a man who asked Sen. McCain if he planned on “cleaning house in Washington.”

McCain’s response was a promise to restore trust and confidence the people have for government. He also said he will reform the way the government does business.