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Scholarship offered to help those looking to teach mathematics

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Photo courtesy of http://www.phystec.org,
A five-year $1.26 million grant, which is the main source of funding for this program, was awarded to the university by the National Science Foundation through its Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Photo courtesy of http://www.phystec.orgThe Robert Noyce Scholarship Program at Colorado State University-Pueblo is offered to strengthen mathematics achievement in the region of southeastern Colorado.

The program also tries to provide participants with strong content and the necessary training to teach in high-need schools, and encourages them to continue teaching after their obligatory service period is over.

The Noyce Scholarship Program is a collaboration of faculty in the Department of Mathematics and Physics and the Teacher Education Program at the university, faculty of four area community colleges, two local school districts and five community partners.

A five-year $1.26 million grant, which is the main source of funding for this program, was awarded to the university by the National Science Foundation through its Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program.

This goal is to provide incentives to attract undergraduates and professionals with bachelor’s degrees to the profession of teaching mathematics.

This program is offered nationwide, with the NSF’s main goal being to address the shortage of fully credentialed K-12 mathematics teachers. This program encourages talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and professionals to enter the teaching profession.

The Noyce Scholars Program aims to provide scholarships, stipends and academic programs to undergraduate mathematics majors who are able to earn a full teaching credential after committing to teaching in a high-need K-12 school district.

Since its inception in 2011, the scholarship program has supported 11 undergraduate students and one student with stipend support.  Three Noyce scholars are currently teaching in Pueblo schools, and two are involved in completing their student teaching this semester.  In spring 2014, three more Noyce scholars will participate in student teaching.

“The Noyce Scholarship has helped me in many ways,” said Zack Koshak, a 2012-13 Noyce Scholar.  “It has allowed me to focus solely on my education and not have to stress about working long hours to pay for school. It also has given me confidence that I can be a successful teacher.”

To be eligible for this scholarship, a student must be a U.S. citizen, national or permanent resident alien. The student must also major in mathematics, engineering or a science discipline, possess a grade point average of 2.75 or higher and fulfill the service requirement of teaching two years in a high-need school district for each year of Noyce support.

If the Noyce scholars do not fulfill the two-year teaching requirement in a high-need school district for each year of support, they will be required to pay the stipend and scholarship back along with interest.

Applicants receiving this scholarship are responsible to collect demographic data and statistics on scholarship and stipend recipients, as a part of an annual report.

Freshmen and sophomores can attend sessions and prepare for future scholarships and internship opportunities through this program. Application forms for the 2014-15 Noyce Scholarships for college juniors and seniors are available and offer up to $14,000 annually.

One-year stipends of up to $24,000 are also available for this scholarship to applicants who already have a degree in mathematics, science or engineering but want to pursue a mathematics teaching license.

The financial support options for this program are available both for full-time and part-time students, and paid summer internship programs are available for freshmen and sophomores who wish to explore the possibility of a teaching career in secondary mathematics.